Rash thoughts about .NET, C#, F# and Dynamics NAV.


"Every solution will only lead to new problems."

Category .NET

In dieser Kategorie geht es um das Microsoft .NET Framework und damit zusammenhängende Technologien wie CLR, C#, ASP.NET, WCF, WF und WPF.

Wednesday, 15. January 2014


FSharp.Configuration 0.1 released

Filed under: C#,F#,Informatik — Steffen Forkmann at 13:40 Uhr

As part of a longer process of making FSharpx better maintainable I created a new project called FSharp.Configuration. It contains type providers for the configuration of .NET projects:

Yaml type provider

Additonal information:

Please tell me what you think.

Tuesday, 14. January 2014


FSharpx.Collections 1.9 released

Filed under: .NET,C#,F#,FAKE - F# Make,Informatik — Steffen Forkmann at 11:29 Uhr

I’m happy to annouce the new release of the FSharpx.Collections package on nuget.

Most important changes:

Please tell me if it works for you.

Tuesday, 16. April 2013


Don’t be that guy!

Filed under: C# — Steffen Forkmann at 9:21 Uhr

I love to work on open source projects, but from time to time I have my doubts. My friend Daniel Nauck created a wonderful open source licensing project (see my blog post) and now we had to see this:

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I am not a lawyer and rebranding a tool might be permitted by the MIT license, but seriously what are they thinking?

They even removed license information from the source files.

// The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be
// included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

It’s really ironic to violate the license of a licensing tool, but please don’t be that guy!

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Wednesday, 6. March 2013


License all the things with Portable.Licensing 1.0

Filed under: C#,F# — Steffen Forkmann at 10:20 Uhr

"Portable.Licensing is a cross platform open source software licensing framework which allows you to implement licensing into your application or library.

It is targeting the Portable Class Library and thus runs on nearly every .NET/Mono profile including Silverlight, Windows Phone, Windows Store App, Xamarin.iOS, Xamarin.Android, Xamarin.Mac and XBox 360. Use it for your Desktop- (WinForms, WPF, etc.), Console-, Service-, Web- (ASP.NET, MVC, etc.), Mobile (Xamarin.iOS, Xamarin.Android) or even LightSwitch applications."

[Project site]

Yep, you read this correct. This project gives you a free licensing tool for all .NET/mono platforms including stuff like Android and iOS. It’s hosted on github and already on nuget and the Xamarin store, so it’s pretty easy to use – even from F#.

Create a license

There is a really good documentation on the github project page (and there is even a sample implementation for a License Manager app), but just to give you a small glimpse:

Make sure to keep the private key private and distribute the public key with your app.

Validate a license

So try it out and don’t forget to thank Daniel Nauck for this awesome new tool.

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Sunday, 27. January 2013


Released new AssemblyVersion tasks for FAKE

Filed under: C#,F#,FAKE - F# Make — Steffen Forkmann at 16:11 Uhr

Today I released two new AssemblyInfo tasks for FAKE and marked the old one as obsolete. One advantage of the new tasks is that they only generate the specified attributes and no more. There are already a lot of predefined attributes but it’s also possible to specify new ones. Here is a small example:

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Friday, 18. January 2013


Release of the WMI type provider on nuget

Filed under: F#,Visual Studio — Steffen Forkmann at 15:57 Uhr

Today I’m happy to annouce that we have a new type provider in FSharpx. Yesterday I ported the WMI type provider from the F# sample pack and released it as a nuget package. This type provider allows to use Intellisense on data from the Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI).

Create a new F# project in Visual Studio 2012 and install the FSharpx.TypeProviders.Management package via nuget. The package manager references two libraries and you have to remove the reference to Samples.Management.TypeProvider.DesignTime manually. After you reference System.Management you can start to access WMI:

You can find a lot more samples in the F# Sample pack.

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Sunday, 6. January 2013


Bug in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 OData services?!

Filed under: C#,Dynamics NAV 2013,Navision,Visual Studio — Steffen Forkmann at 10:24 Uhr

The “Walkthrough: Creating and Interacting with a Page Web Service (OData)” shows how we can easily access Dynamics NAV OData from the default company:

But somewhere in this process there seems to be a bug. If I want to access data from a different company I get a timeout:

I found a workaround for this, but if anybody knows more about this please write a comment.

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Friday, 4. January 2013


F# and Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 OData Services

Filed under: C#,Diverses,Dynamics NAV 2009,Dynamics NAV 2013,F#,Visual Studio — Steffen Forkmann at 13:52 Uhr

In my last post I described how we can access Dynamics NAV 2009 SOAP web services from F# and the benefits we get by using a type provder. Since version 2013 it’s also possible to expose NAV pages via OData. In this article I will show you how the OData type provider which is part of F# 3 can help you to easily access this data.

Exposing the data

First of all follow this walkthrough and expose the Customer Page from Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 as an OData feed.

Show the available companies

Let’s try to connect to the OData feed and list all available companies. Therefore we create a new F# console project (.NET 4.0) in Visual Studio 2012 and add references to FSharp.Data.TypeProviders and System.Data.Services.Client. With the following snippet we can access and print the company names:

As you can see we don’t need to use the “Add Service Reference” dialog. All service type are generated on the fly.

Access data within a company

Unfortunately Dynamics NAV 2013 seems to have a bug in the generated metadata. In order to access data within a company we need to apply a small trick. In the following sample we create a modified data context which points directly to a company:

Now we can start to access the data:

As you can see this approach is very easy and avoids the problem with the manual code generation. If you expose more pages then they are instantly available in your code.

As with the Wsdl type provider you can expose the generated types from this F# project for use in C# projects.

Further information:

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Thursday, 3. January 2013


F# and Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009 Web Services

Filed under: C#,Dynamics NAV 2009,F#,Navision,Visual Studio,WCF — Steffen Forkmann at 9:25 Uhr

If you are a Dynamics NAV developer you have probably heared of the web services feature which comes with the 2009 version. In this walkthrough you can learn how to create and consume a Codeunit Web Service. This method works very well if you only need to create the C# proxy classes once. If you have more than one developer, an automated build system, changing web services or many web services then you will come to a point where this code generation system is very difficult to handle.

Microsoft Visual F# 3.0 comes with feature called “type providers” that helps to simplify your life in such a situation. For the case of WCF the Wsdl type provider allows us to automate the proxy generation. Let’s see how this works.

Web service generation

In the first step we create the Dynamics NAV 2009 Codeunit web service in exactly the same way as in the MSDN walkthrough.

Connecting to the web service

Now we create a new F# console project (.NET 4.0 or 4.5) in Visual Studio 2012 and add references to FSharp.Data.TypeProvidersSystem.Runtime.Serialization and System.ServiceModel. After this we are ready to use the Wsdl type provider:

At this point the type provider creates the proxy classes in the background – no “add web reference” dialog is needed. The only thing we need to do is configuring the access security and consume the webservice:

Access from C#

This is so much easier than the C# version from the walkthrough. But if you want you can still access the provided types from C#. Just add a new C# project to the solution and reference the F# project. In the F# project rename Program.fs to Services.fs and expose the service via a new function:

In the C# project you can now access the service like this:

Changing the service

Now let’s see what happens if we change the service. Go to the Letters Codeunit in Dynamics NAV 2009 and add a second parameter (allLetters:Boolean) to the Capitalize method. After saving the Codeunit go back to the C# project and try to compile it again. As you can see the changes are directly reflected as a compile error.

In the next blog post I will show you how you can easily access a Dynamics NAV 2013 OData feed from F#.

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Thursday, 13. September 2012


Graph type providers in FSharpx

Filed under: C#,F#,Informatik,Mathematik — Steffen Forkmann at 9:24 Uhr

After the official Visual Studio 2012 launch yesterday I think it’s a good idea to announce two new type providers which are based on the DGMLTypeProvider from the F# 3.0 Sample Pack.

Synchronous and asynchronous state machine

The first one is only a small extension to the DGMLTypeProvider by Tao. which allows to generate state machines from DGML files. The extension is simply that you can choose between the original async state machine and a synchronous version, which allows easier testing.

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If you want the async version, which performs all state transitions asynchronously, you only have to write AsyncStateMachine instead of StateMachine.

State machine as a network of types

The generated state machine performs only valid state transitions, but we can go one step further and model the state transitions as compile time restrictions:

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As you can see the compiler knows that we are in State2 and allows only the transitions to State3 and State4.

If you write labels on the edges of the graph the type provider will generate the method names based on the edge label. In the following sample I’ve created a small finite-state machine which allows to check a binary number if it has an even or odd number of zeros:

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As you can see in this case the compiler has already calculated that 10100 has an odd number of zeros – no need to run the test Zwinkerndes Smiley.

This stuff is already part of the FSharpx.TypeProviders.Graph package on nuget so please check it out and give feedback.

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