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Thursday, 8. January 2009


How I do Continuous Integration with my C# / F# projects – part III: Running automated UnitTests

Filed under: C#,English posts,F#,Tools,Visual Studio — Steffen Forkmann at 19:13 Uhr

In the last two posts I showed how to set up a Subversion (part I: Setting up Source Control) and a TeamCity server (part II: Setting up a Continuous Integration Server).

This time I will show how we can integrate NUnit to run automated test at each build. TeamCity supports all major Testing Frameworks (including MS Test) but I will concentrate on NUnit here.

"NUnit is a unit-testing framework for all .Net languages. Initially ported from JUnit, the current production release, version 2.4, is the fifth major release of this xUnit based unit testing tool for Microsoft .NET. It is written entirely in C# and has been completely redesigned to take advantage of many .NET language features, for example custom attributes and other reflection related capabilities. NUnit brings xUnit to all .NET languages."

[product homepage]

Creating a TestProject

First of all download and install NUnit 2.4.8 (or higher) from http://www.nunit.org/.

Now we add a small function to our F# source code:

let rec factorial = function  
  | 0 -> 1
  | n when n > 0 -> n * factorial (n-1)
  | _ -> invalid_arg "Argument not valid"

This is the function we want to test. We add a new C# class library to our solution (e.g. “TestCITestLib” ;-) ) and add a reference to nunit.framework. Inside this new TestLibrary we add a TestClass with the following code:

namespace TestCITestLib
{
    using NUnit.Framework;

    [TestFixture]
    public class FactorialTest
    {
        [Test]
        public void TestFactorial()
        {
            Assert.AreEqual(1, Program.factorial(0));
            Assert.AreEqual(1, Program.factorial(1));
            Assert.AreEqual(120, Program.factorial(5));
        }

        [Test]
        public void TestFactorialException()
        {
            Program.factorial(-1);
        }
    }
}

To ensure the build runner is able to compile our solution we put the nunit.framework.dll near to our TestProject and commit our changes.

Adding Nunit.framework.dll

Configure TeamCity for UnitTesting

The next step is to tell TeamCity that the build runner should run our UnitTests:

Configure build runner for NUnit

If we now run the build we should get the following error:

UnitTest error during automated build

Our second test function failed, because we didn’t expect the System.ArgumentException. We can fix this issue by adding the corresponding attribute to the Testfunction:

[Test,
 ExpectedException(typeof(System.ArgumentException))]
public void TestFactorialException()
{
    Program.factorial(-1);
}0

Tests passed

Configure the build output

At this point we have a minimalistic Continuous Integration infrastructure. Every time someone performs a Commit on our repository a automated build will be started and the sources will be tested against the given UnitTests. Now we should concentrate on getting our build output – the artifacts. The term artifact is usually used to refer to files or directories produced during a build. Examples of such artifacts are:

  • Binaries (*.exe, *.dll)
  • Software packages and installers (*.zip, *.msi)
  • Documentation files (e.g. help files)
  • Reports (test reports, coverage reports, …)

At this time we are only interested in the binaries (this means CITestLib.dll). We can add the following artifact definition to our TeamCity project:

Configure artifacts in TeamCity

If we now rebuild our solution the build runner collects the configured artifacts and stores them with all build information:

Collected artifacts

Next time I will show how we can add more artifacts – e.g. an automated documentation.

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1 Comment »

  1. [...] with My C#/F# Projects – Part II: Setting Up a Continuous Integration Server and Part III: Running Automated Unit Tests (Steffen [...]

    Pingback by Dew Drop - January 9, 2009 | Alvin Ashcraft's Morning Dew — Friday, 9. January 2009 um 17:03 Uhr

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